— Volume V No. 2: May 2009 —

The Application of Cost Management and Life-Cycle Cost Theory to Homeland Security National Priorities

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AUTHOR:
Robert Hall

Robert Hall is an associate director at CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization that leads the nation in supporting preparedness and response activities at the federal, state, and local levels. He manages projects at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and for the state and local community. His work includes support for the Federal Emergency Management Agency Joint Project Team, target capability life-cycle cost analysis, and a Capability Assessment Framework for South Carolina. Mr. Hall has a wide range of experience in emergency preparedness in both military and civilian settings including exercise design, execution, and evaluation; emergency plans development and evaluation; command and control (C2) research; and C2 management. Prior to working for CNA, Mr. Hall was a technical advisor for Homeland Security at the Delaware Emergency Management Agency and prior to that enjoyed a twenty-five-year career in the U.S. Air Force. Mr. Hall may be contacted at hallr@cna.org.

AUTHOR:
Erica Dimitrov

Erica Dusenberry Dimitrov is a research analyst at CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization that leads the nation in supporting preparedness and response activities at the federal, state, and local levels. Her work primarily focuses on risk management, local-level emergency preparedness planning, homeland security exercise support and evaluation, and life-cycle cost analysis. Prior to joining CNA, she worked for the National Sheriffs’ Association where she advocated local law enforcement issues on Capitol Hill. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and a master’s degree from the University of Iowa. Ms. Dusenberry Dimitrov may be contacted at: dusenbe@cna.org.

ABSTRACT:
The 2007 National Preparedness Guidelines introduces the concept of a National Preparedness System in which national capabilities are coordinated to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from all hazards in a way that balances risk with resources and need. To understand the resource implications of the National Preparedness System, it is critically important to determine the costs associated with achieving and sustaining target levels of capability. The purpose of this article is threefold. First, it documents a methodology that uses life-cycle cost (LCC) theory to quantify the costs of achieving and sustaining target capabilities and national priorities within the National Preparedness System. Second, the article applies the methodology to the Explosive Device Response Operations (EDRO) target capability. Third, it articulates a number of next steps needed to develop and apply LCC methods to national preparedness.

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SUGGESTED CITATION:
Hall, Robert, and Erica Dimitrov. “The Application of Cost Management and Life-Cycle Cost Theory to Homeland Security National Priorities.” Homeland Security Affairs 5, issue 2 (May 2009)
http://www.hsaj.org/?article=5.2.6 (2009)]
http://www.hsaj.org/