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CHDS Theses: Executive Summaries

CHDS Master's students summarize their research and the impacts of that work on agency practices and the nation's security.

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CHDS Theses: Executive Summaries

Sound the Alarm: Why Do So Few African Americans Serve as Firefighters and Paramedics?

By Colin Burress – Executive Summary – The demographics of the fire department workforce, including firefighters and paramedics, often do not reflect communities. Fire and emergency medical service (EMS) departments nationwide struggle to recruit and retain African American members. Even […]

Sound the Alarm: Why Do So Few African Americans Serve as Firefighters and Paramedics?

Transparancy As A Tool: Securing Collaborative Approaches to Federal Homeland Security Funding in the Los Angeles Area

By Nicolas Riddal -Executive Summary- The Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) is designed to enhance regional preparedness and capabilities in high-threat, high-density urban areas.[1] In 2022, UASI grants funded nearly $615 million nationwide and just under $68 million for the

Transparancy As A Tool: Securing Collaborative Approaches to Federal Homeland Security Funding in the Los Angeles Area

The Maritime Operational Threat Response Plan: A Model for Interagency Cooperation

By Lee Gorlin – Executive Summary – History has shown that homeland security is a learning process and an evolution, whereby threats are identified, and strategies and policies are developed and implemented. Those strategies and policies are occasionally tested in

The Maritime Operational Threat Response Plan: A Model for Interagency Cooperation

An Analysis of the United States Secret Service Protective Intelligence Division’s Mental Illness Training Program: Is There Room for Improvement?

By William Elliott – Executive Summary – The purpose of this thesis was to examine whether the U.S. Secret Service provides sufficient mental illness training and support to its special agents conducting protective intelligence (PI) investigations and to determine whether

An Analysis of the United States Secret Service Protective Intelligence Division’s Mental Illness Training Program: Is There Room for Improvement?

Blue Water, White Powder: Trends in Maritime Narcotics Trafficking in the Greater Caribbean

By Walker Mills -Executive Summary- In the 1980s, the U.S. military was drawn into the counternarcotics fight to lead “detection and monitoring” of American air and maritime borders because the federal government was struggling to deal with an influx of

Blue Water, White Powder: Trends in Maritime Narcotics Trafficking in the Greater Caribbean

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