Notes from the Editor

The May 2023 Issue of Homeland Security Affairs features a policy essay that warns of conflicts between Emergency Management and Homeland Defense missions in the event of a major war and a research article that assesses how DHS has incorporated climate change into its mission portfolio. Read more.

Homeland Security Affairs

Homeland Security Affairs

Changing Homeland Security: A Strategic Logic of Special Event Security

Most American communities will never host a large-scale event, but the lessons learned from providing security at major events, such as the Olympics, can be scaled to other events. These lessons may also help guide homeland security preparedness, particularly in states, regions, and cities.

By Christopher Bellavita

Changing Homeland Security: A Strategic Logic of Special Event Security

The National Disaster Medical System’s Reliance on Civilian-Based Medical Response Teams in a Pandemic is Unsound

The world is threatened with a pandemic, an event considered to be the greatest public health risk, with the potential to kill as many as forty to fifty million people, sicken hundreds of millions, and significantly impact the global economy.

By John Delaney

The National Disaster Medical System’s Reliance on Civilian-Based Medical Response Teams in a Pandemic is Unsound

A Domestic Intelligence Agency for the United States? A Comparative Analysis of Domestic Intelligence Agencies and Their Implications for Homeland Security

The intelligence community has attempted to refocus to track terrorists that use unconventional means — a more complex task. This complexity is compounded by terrorist disregard for borders, laws, and transnational financing.

By James Burch

A Domestic Intelligence Agency for the United States? A Comparative Analysis of Domestic Intelligence Agencies and Their Implications for Homeland Security

How Would Americans Allocate Anti-Terrorism Spending? Findings from a National Survey of Attitudes about Terrorism

U.S. residents are very concerned about terrorist attacks and they are willing to commit substantial sums to prevent further terrorist incidents, according to the results of a large national survey of the public’s thoughts about terrorism.

By Koel Ghosh, Dennis Degeneffe, Jean Kinsey, and Thomas Stinson

How Would Americans Allocate Anti-Terrorism Spending? Findings from a National Survey of Attitudes about Terrorism

Letter to the Editor: Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy

A reader responds to the recent article “Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy.” by W. David Stephenson and Eric Bonabeau in “Homeland Security Affairs III, No. 1 (February 2007).

By E. David Hodgins

Letter to the Editor: Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy

Fractured Fairy Tale: The War on Terror and the Emperor’s New Clothes 2

The War on Terror continues to attract the allegiance of every politician in the country, whether as a justification for keeping U.S. troops in Iraq (to win in the “central front” in the War on Terror), or as a justification for withdrawing them (to win the really crucial battles in the War on Terror at home and in Afghanistan).

By Ian Lustick

Fractured Fairy Tale: The War on Terror and the Emperor’s New Clothes 2

Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy

Since Hurricane Katrina, attention has focused on improving management of response to natural disasters and terrorist attacks. However, what if the current management approach is so fundamentally mismatched to the challenge at hand that, even when improved, it is still unequal to the task?

By Eric Bonabeau and W. David Stephenson

Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy

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