Notes from the Editor

The May 2022 Issue of Homeland Security Affairs contains a research article which provides a comparative analysis of the Countering Violent Extremism/Counterterrorism policies of five Western nations and a research article which provides a critical analysis of the way that discount rates are used in FEMA hazard mitigation projects. Read more.

Homeland Security Affairs

Homeland Security Affairs

Hurricane Katrina as a Predictable Surprise

The concept of predictable surprises, i.e. failures to take preventative action in the face of known threats, was outlined by Max Bazerman and Michael Watkins in their book by the same name. This paper discusses predictable surprises as primarily organizational events that result from failure of organizational processes to support surprise-avoidance rather than surprise-conducive actions by individual members.

By Larry Irons

Maritime Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multi-Agency Command and Control in an Asymmetric Environment

As a maritime nation, the United States is economically and strategically reliant on its ports, a fact well known to our potential enemies in the Global War on Terror. A successful attack against maritime critical infrastructure in our ports has the potential to cause major economic disruption and create mass casualties and conflagration.

By Robert Watts

Measuring Prevention

How do we know if prevention is working? Not only is the measurement of prevention activities possible, the methodologies of “how” to measure already exist in numerous processes. Additionally, the definitions of “what” to measure have been both experienced and discussed.

By Glen Woodbury

Transforming Border Security: Prevention First

The events of September 11, 2001 caused the nation’s leaders to accelerate existing border programs aimed at prevention. Traditionally, the “prevention” of border violations has involved interdiction (physically impeding any incursion while it is occurring), preemption (through routine screening to intercept illegal shipments, weapons, people, or other illicit cargo), and deterrence (where an action taken means a potential violator does not plan or even attempt an illegal entry).

By Robert Bach

What is Preventing Homeland Security?

Almost four years have gone by since the United States formally joined the global war on terrorism. Yet something stops us from giving as much attention to preventing terrorism as we give to preparing to respond to the next attack. One reason is a homeland security system that is designed for response rather than prevention.

By Christopher Bellavita

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