Notes from the Editor

The May 2023 Issue of Homeland Security Affairs features a policy essay that warns of conflicts between Emergency Management and Homeland Defense missions in the event of a major war and a research article that assesses how DHS has incorporated climate change into its mission portfolio. Read more.

Homeland Security Affairs

Homeland Security Affairs

Philosophy and Disaster

Philosophers have traditionally written from the perspective of ordinary people and they are as vulnerable to fear as other members of the public. Academic philosophers can contribute to the multi-disciplinary field of homeland security and disaster studies through extensions of social contract theory from political philosophy, and applications of moral systems.

By Naomi Zack

Philosophy and Disaster

Changing Homeland Security: Teaching the Core

Homeland security is in a pre-paradigm phase as a professional discipline. There are at least four dozen ways colleges, universities, agencies, and textbook publishers have conceptualized homeland security education. A review of the principal themes presented by those entities identified over fifty topics that come under the rubric of “Homeland Security.”

By Christopher Bellavita and Ellen Gordon

Changing Homeland Security: Teaching the Core

“Who’s in Charge?” New Challenges in Homeland Defense and Homeland Security

This article describes the approach approved in the DOD-HLS Joint Operating Concept (HLS JOC) that describes how DOD intends to perform its responsibilities associated with securing the homeland, to include homeland defense and civil support missions, and supporting emergency preparedness planning activities.

By Thomas Goss

“Who’s in Charge?” New Challenges in Homeland Defense and Homeland Security

Deconvolution of Plant Type(s) for Homeland Security Enforcement Using Remote Sensing on a UAV Collection Platform

The technological ability to distinguish drug plants from other plant types has important implications for law enforcement (LE), wildfire recovery, reservoir protection, environmental impact, agricultural issues, and military concerns. This ability, termed “deconvolution,” can be a valuable technological tool to fight drug trafficking and thus the war on terror.

By James Tindall

Deconvolution of Plant Type(s) for Homeland Security Enforcement Using Remote Sensing on a UAV Collection Platform

Hurricane Katrina as a Predictable Surprise

The concept of predictable surprises, i.e. failures to take preventative action in the face of known threats, was outlined by Max Bazerman and Michael Watkins in their book by the same name. This paper discusses predictable surprises as primarily organizational events that result from failure of organizational processes to support surprise-avoidance rather than surprise-conducive actions by individual members.

By Larry Irons

Hurricane Katrina as a Predictable Surprise

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