Assessment of Public Health Infrastructure to Determine Public Health Preparedness

Anke Richter and Denise Santiago ABSTRACT: The Strategy for Homeland Security stresses the need for a robust public health component to respond to and recover from a range of emergencies. However, dire problems with the current public health manpower infrastructure have been reported for more than fifteen years and continue to be a problem. Bioterrorism

Notes from the Editor (Vol. II, Iss. 2)

Download the full issue. The July 2006 issue of Homeland Security Affairs offers articles about risk perception, domestic right wing extremist groups, social network analysis, and the impact of foreign policy on homeland security. It also features two articles that question conventional perspectives about the meaning of “lessons learned” and about the appropriate role of

Social Capital: Dealing with Community Emergencies

Russell Dynes ABSTRACT: Terrorism produces what is conventionally called disaster. The locus of the response to disaster is the community, which as a unit has the social capital necessary to respond to disasters. The six forms of social capital referenced in this article are obligations and expectations, informational potential, norms and effective sanctions, authority relations,

Risk Perception and Terrorism: Applying the Psychometric Paradigm

Clinton M. Jenkin ABSTRACT: While expert risk analyses are based on calculations of probability and damage, public estimates of risk are more often based on qualitative factors. It is important to understand how the public, not just homeland security experts, perceive and react to the threat of terrorism. Risk perception research in general, and the

The National Military Strategic Plan for the War on Terrorism: An Assessment

Nadav Morag ABSTRACT: This article analyses the National Military Strategic Plan for the War on Terrorism issued on February 1, 2006 by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The article claims that the strategic plan is flawed for three reasons: 1) its goals are unclear and unrealistic, 2) policy implementation is primarily dependent

Social Network Analysis as an Approach to Combat Terrorism: Past, Present, and Future Research

Steve Ressler ABSTRACT: As the United States enters the twenty-first century, the biggest threat to the national security of the U.S. is terrorist organizations. These are primarily decentralized structures that consist of a series of loosely connected individuals forming around an ideology. The U.S is unable to combat this opponent with traditional, hierarchical approaches to

Changing Homeland Security: What Should Homeland Security Leaders Be Talking About?

Christopher Bellavita ABSTRACT: There is little political will to substantially alter the organizational and programmatic system that characterizes U.S. homeland security. The system we have is the one we have to work with, at least until something significant happens: another attack, a catastrophic natural disaster, a national public health emergency, or a new political administration.