Volume V

Volume V

The Application of Cost Management and Life-Cycle Cost Theory to Homeland Security National Priorities

The 2007 National Preparedness Guidelines introduces the concept of a National Preparedness System in which national capabilities are coordinated to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from all hazards in a way that balances risk with resources and need.

By Robert Hall and Erica Dimitrov

The Application of Cost Management and Life-Cycle Cost Theory to Homeland Security National Priorities

The Terrorist Threat to Inbound U.S. Passenger Flights: Inadequate Government Response

Commercial civil aviation has been the target of terrorist attacks for decades. Most attacks have been by means of bombs placed on aircraft. In recent years, there have been several attempts to bring explosive devices on board by using suicide terrorists as ticketed passengers.

By Anthony Fainberg

The Terrorist Threat to Inbound U.S. Passenger Flights: Inadequate Government Response

Just How Much Does That Cost, Anyway? An Analysis of the Financial Costs and Benefits of the “No-Fly” List

This article conducts a financial cost and security benefit analysis of the United States government’s “no fly” list. On September 11, 2001 the no fly list contained sixteen names of terrorists and other individuals deemed threatening to the U.S.

By Marcus Holmes

Just How Much Does That Cost, Anyway? An Analysis of the Financial Costs and Benefits of the “No-Fly” List

Competing with Intelligence: New Directions in China’s Quest for Intangible Property and Implications for Homeland Security

The United States faces a growing national security threat from Chinese corporations that employ robust competitive intelligence (CI) programs to enhance illegal company- or government-directed espionage and intellectual property (IP) theft and infringement.

By Robert Slate

Competing with Intelligence: New Directions in China’s Quest for Intangible Property and Implications for Homeland Security

Changing Homeland Security: The Year in Review — 2008

In December 2008, Christopher Bellavita asked members of the Naval Postgraduate School’s extended homeland security network to respond to two questions: (1) From your perspective — and using whatever criteria you’d like — what would you say was a top homeland security-related issue or story in 2008 and why and (2) What do you consider an emerging homeland security issue?

By Christopher Bellavita

Changing Homeland Security: The Year in Review — 2008

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