Notes from the Editor (Disasters in North America)

Supplement: Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America While most topics involving Homeland Security relate to domestic policy considerations, there are also foreign policy implications. Nowhere is this more relevant than in the United States’ relations with its North American neighbors of Canada and Mexico. Both of these

Mexico’s Insecurity in North America

Supplement: Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America Abelardo Rodriguez Sumano ABSTRACT: Dr. Abelardo Rodriguez, Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico, examines Mexico’s challenges in facing the new security environment in the hemisphere since 9/11. His article argues that Mexico’s incapacity to develop a coherent national and regional security

Perimeter Defense and Regional Security Cooperation in North America: United States, Canada, and Mexico

Supplement: Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America Richard Kilroy ABSTRACT: Dr. Richard J. Kilroy, Jr., Virginia Military Institute, USA, explores the concept of building regional security cooperation between the nations of North America, examining the history of security cooperation between the three nations in light of previous

Catastrophic Terrorism at the Border: The Case of the Canada-United States Border

Supplement: Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America Todd Hataley ABSTRACT: Dr. Todd Hataley, Royal Military College, discusses the significance of a catastrophic terrorist event occurring at a major crossing site on the Canada-U.S. border. Land border crossings between Canada and the United States are a critical component

Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America

Supplement: Proceedings of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America Lance Robinson ABSTRACT: Dr. Lance Robinson, Battelle Corporation, provides a succinct overview of the Workshop on Preparing for and Responding to Disasters in North America, which occurred in San Antonio, TX, November 6-7, 2006. The Proceedings describe the content and

Book Review: The Next Catastrophe: Reducing Our Vulnerabilities to Natural, Industrial, and Terrorist Disasters by Charles Perrow

Paul Stockton ABSTRACT: Paul Stockton reviews The Next Catastrophe: Reducing Our Vulnerabilities to Natural, Industrial, and Terrorist Disasters, by Charles Perrow. SUGGESTED CITATION: Stockton, Paul. “The Next Catastrophe: Reducing Our Vulnerabilities to Natural, Industrial, and Terrorist Disasters by Charles Perrow.” Homeland Security Affairs 3, Article 7 (September 2007). https://www.hsaj.org/articles/596 The Next Catastrophe: Reducing Our Vulnerabilities

The Use of EMS Personnel as Intelligence Sensors: Critical Issues and Recommended Practices

Michael Petrie ABSTRACT: The use of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel as information collectors to support Terrorism Early Warning Groups (TEWGs) and other intelligence fusion centers is advocated by academic papers, professional journals, and best-practice documents. However, intelligence fusion centers are not integrating EMS personnel into their information collection systems, due to strategic concerns about

Identity Crisis: Defining the Problem and Framing a Solution for Terrorism Incident Response

Mark Landahl ABSTRACT: The analysis of domestic incidents of terrorism has revealed many gaps in our nation’s capability to effectively manage the multi-jurisdictional response. Although many gaps have been addressed through implementation of measures based on lessons learned, the most pervasive unresolved issue remains the ability to properly identify first response personnel on incident scenes.

Application of the Maximum Flow Problem to Sensor Placement on Urban Road Networks for Homeland Security

Robert L. Barnett, D. Sean Bovey, Robert J. Atwell, and Lowell Bruce Anderson ABSTRACT: The use of sensors in the detection of terrorists, weapons, or dangerous materials transported along the roadways of the United States could contribute to the protection of urban population centers from attack. Two critical issues in designing a system for detecting