Risk Perception and Terrorism: Applying the Psychometric Paradigm

Clinton M. Jenkin ABSTRACT: While expert risk analyses are based on calculations of probability and damage, public estimates of risk are more often based on qualitative factors. It is important to understand how the public, not just homeland security experts, perceive and react to the threat of terrorism. Risk perception research in general, and the

Social Capital: Dealing with Community Emergencies

Russell Dynes ABSTRACT: Terrorism produces what is conventionally called disaster. The locus of the response to disaster is the community, which as a unit has the social capital necessary to respond to disasters. The six forms of social capital referenced in this article are obligations and expectations, informational potential, norms and effective sanctions, authority relations,

Lessons We Don’t Learn: A Study of the Lessons of Disasters, Why We Repeat Them, and How We Can Learn Them

Amy Donahue and Robert Tuohy ABSTRACT: Emergency responders intervene before and during disasters to save lives and property. The uncertainty and infrequency of disasters make it hard for responders to validate that their response strategies will be effective, however. As a result, emergency response organizations use processes for identifying and disseminating lessons in hopes that

On Killing al-Zarqawi – Does United States Policy Know its Tools in the War on Terror?

Donald Reed ABSTRACT: Much of the media-pundit and popular analysis that has followed the death of al Qaeda leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi has focused on how his death will affect the outcome of the war in Iraq. However, the emphasis on outcome is not the right approach. Al-Zarqawi’s death serves a greater strategic purpose both

Changing Homeland Security: What Should Homeland Security Leaders Be Talking About?

Christopher Bellavita ABSTRACT: There is little political will to substantially alter the organizational and programmatic system that characterizes U.S. homeland security. The system we have is the one we have to work with, at least until something significant happens: another attack, a catastrophic natural disaster, a national public health emergency, or a new political administration.

Notes from the Editor (Vol. II, Iss. 1)

Download the full issue. Welcome to the third edition of Homeland Security Affairs. Our Spring 2006 issue features articles about intelligence and homeland security, the demarcations between homeland defense and security, and ideas about teaching an introductory course in homeland security. We include a discussion of how Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used domestically

Philosophy and Disaster

Naomi Zack ABSTRACT: Philosophers have traditionally written from the perspective of ordinary people and they are as vulnerable to fear as other members of the public. Academic philosophers can contribute to the multi-disciplinary field of homeland security and disaster studies through extensions of social contract theory from political philosophy, and applications of moral systems. The

Deconvolution of Plant Type(s) for Homeland Security Enforcement Using Remote Sensing on a UAV Collection Platform

James Tindall ABSTRACT: The technological ability to distinguish drug plants from other plant types has important implications for law enforcement (LE), wildfire recovery, reservoir protection, environmental impact, agricultural issues, and military concerns. This ability, termed “deconvolution,” can be a valuable technological tool to fight drug trafficking and thus the war on terror. The use of

The Disaster after 9/11: The Department of Homeland Security and the Intelligence Reorganization

Charles Perrow ABSTRACT: In reorganizing homeland defense after 9/11, the government had three options: White House control, power sharing between agencies, or congressional control. The option pursued – reorganizing twenty-two separate agencies under a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) reporting to Congress – has resulted in a dysfunctional organization that is understaffed and underfunded, while