The National Disaster Medical System’s Reliance on Civilian-Based Medical Response Teams in a Pandemic is Unsound

John Delaney ABSTRACT: The world is threatened with a pandemic, an event considered to be the greatest public health risk, with the potential to kill as many as forty to fifty million people, sicken hundreds of millions, and significantly impact the global economy. Countries and health organizations throughout the world are monitoring the threat and

Interoperability: Stop Blaming the Radio

Ronald Timmons ABSTRACT: Communications continues to be a major issue in post-disaster after-action reports. Under the umbrella term interoperability, grant funding is facilitating deployment of equipment to enable field personnel to patch radio systems together, with the expectation of improving emergency scene communications. However, numerous causal factors, beyond hardware limitations, contribute to inadequate disaster communications.

Deterrence, Terrorism, and American Values

Uri Fisher ABSTRACT: This article explores the practical obstacles to applying deterrence to United States counterterrorism policy. Many commentators still discuss deterrence as a tool for U.S. policymakers to use to prevent future terrorist attacks on the U.S. homeland or its interests abroad. This paper argues that, while theoretically deterrence may be a viable approach

Expecting the Unexpected: The Need for a Networked Terrorism and Disaster Response Strategy

Eric Bonabeau and W. David Stephenson ABSTRACT: Since Hurricane Katrina, attention has focused on improving management of response to natural disasters and terrorist attacks. However, what if the current management approach is so fundamentally mismatched to the challenge at hand that, even when improved, it is still unequal to the task? This essay argues that

Changing Homeland Security: Ten Essential Homeland Security Books

Christopher Bellavita ABSTRACT: In this essay, Christopher Bellavita reviews what he considers to be ten essential homeland security books, those works he finds himself returning to as he seeks to understand contemporary homeland security events. These include the 9/11 Commission Report (2004); The National Strategy for Homeland Security (2002); After: How America Confronted the September

Assessment of Public Health Infrastructure to Determine Public Health Preparedness

Anke Richter and Denise Santiago ABSTRACT: The Strategy for Homeland Security stresses the need for a robust public health component to respond to and recover from a range of emergencies. However, dire problems with the current public health manpower infrastructure have been reported for more than fifteen years and continue to be a problem. Bioterrorism